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Mar/20/14 (Thu)
10 ways to teach your child to eat well
Simple tips that make all the difference
Children with strict parents are more likely to be overweight, a new study has claimed.This warning comes weeks after British parents were criticised for being too lenient - an indulgence which was, according to Sarah Beeny, television presenter and mother of four, fueling Britain's obesity crisis. So what can parents do to encourage healthy eating in their children? We need to help children learn where their food comes from, who grows it, and why it’s important to share meals with friends and family. Here are 10 ways families can eat with greater awareness and engage young people in food and agriculture. ... 8. Watch educational programmes. Catherine Gund's What’s on Your Plate Project follows multiple kids and their families in their journey to learn more about the food system. Along the way, they discover the importance of being aware of what goes into food, where it comes from, and who creates it.
Mar/04/13 (Mon)
Three Awareness-Based Initiatives for Changing the Food System
by Food Tank Contributor Eve Andrews
What do a Brazilian initiative to reduce restaurant portions, a documentary about several kids’ investigation of the food system, and a university-based start-up have in common? Each of these projects is finding creative ways to call on the public to be more aware of and take responsibility for the food that they eat.
Jul/31/12 (Tue)
Zesty Vegan review
What's On Your Plate? Review
This great little documentary follows Sadie and Safiyah, two 11 year olds over the course of one year around New York City and it’s surroundings. These bright girls have questions about where food comes from (shouldn’t we all?). The girls talk to several different farmers, the burrough chief of New York, the chef and superintendent of New York public schools, and several different families. This is a great documentary to watch with your kids. The information is straightforward and interesting. I always enjoy watching documentaries that have the same point of view I do :) . The girl’s ask questions about why the local public schools don’t purchase carrots or apples from local farmers and instead purchase produce from across the country. What impact does this have on our environment? The savvy girls ask the burrough chief of New York why there are so few green (farmer’s markets) in Harlem. It’s disheartening to see all the cheap, unhealthy fast food available and very little healthy fruits and vegetables. I enjoyed watching the Angel family and the work they are putting into growing and selling vegetables and fruit at their local farmer’s market. There were a lot of individuals that were trying to make a difference and do things locally to help themselves and the people around them. This documentary was not at all preachy just informative and enjoyable to watch.
Jun/15/11 (Wed)
Associated Content
New York City Girls Fight Obesity with Organic Farming
New York City Girls Fight Obesity with Organic Farming Sabrina Young, Yahoo! Contributor Network Jun 15, 2011 If you are interested in changing what your kids eat and stopping the high rates of obesity in the next generation, I highly recommend checking out this great kid-friendly documentary ""What's on Your Plate?" The film's synopsis (from Whatsonyourplateproject.org): "WHAT'S ON YOUR PLATE? is a witty and provocative documentary produced and directed by award-winning Catherine Gund about kids andfood politics. Filmed over the course of one year, the film follows two eleven-year-oldmulti-racial city kids as they explore their place in the food chain. Sadie and Safiyah take a close look at food systems in New York City and its surrounding areas. With the camera as their companion, the girl guides talk to each other, food activists, farmers, new friends, storekeepers, their families, and the viewer, in their quest to understand what's on all of our plates." These girls are making a difference in their hometown by bringing organic food and CSA's to their local NYC neighborhood. The film is also available through instant streaming on netflix. African-Americans and Hispanics have the highest instances of diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity in the US. We can change that by teaching our children how to avoid the snares of the big food companies. Eating well will protect them from the sicknesses that have affected our generation. I wish I had known as much as these two girls when I was younger. I would have avoided serious blood sugar problems today. Enjoy the flick! And take care of your kids! Source: What's on Your Plate. Whatsonyourplateproject.org
Jun/15/11 (Wed)
Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution
Teaching Kids About Real Food From The Ground Up
Story by Natalie Shepp “This is the best field trip I have ever been on!” Those words frequently slip from the mouths of the children who are fortunate enough to visit the Tucson Village Farm (TVF). During their two hours at the farm, they will pick and plant vegetables, prepare soil, see numerous veggies growing, milk a ceramic cow named Gertie (while learning about the benefits of eating dairy), view grains in their whole state, discover the importance of worms to our food system, take a hay ride to pick a pumpkin or learn about agricultural science projects, and munch on a bag of fresh-popped popcorn (not the kind that hides in a bag in the microwave). Tucson Village Farm is the brain-child of Leza Carter, a very determined woman who wanted to offer programs that reconnect young people to a healthy food system, teach them how to grow and prepare fresh food, and empower them to make healthy life choices. The University of Arizona (UA) and Pima County Cooperative Extension graciously invited TVF to join them and they worked together to secure a visible location for the farm at the UA’s Agricultural Extension. Leza then teamed up with Elizabeth Sparks and Cheralyn Shmidt, two like-minded women from the Extension’s 4-H program and the Arizona Nutrition Network to design a “seed-to-table” program. They wanted the children to not only learn about growing their own food, but also learn ways to prepare fresh food that is both healthy and tasty. This year, TVF welcomed over 4,000 kids to the farm. The state-standardized field trips are offered to grades K-12. In addition, there are family workshops, designed so children and parents can learn side-by-side, and a week-long summer Farm Camp for greater immersion. In the last several months, the Tucson Village Farm has teamed up with the local branch of Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution, Arizona Kids Food Revolution, to host a Kid’s Chef Demo Dinner and a Documentary. Participants enjoyed a local chef demonstration and a complimentary healthy dinner provided by the Arizona Kids Food Revolution creator, Charmaine Thomas, owner of Island Eats Catering. After dinner, kids and adults alike viewed a documentary movie entitled “What’s on Your Plate?” - a film, created by kids, which discusses food politics. TVF and the Arizona Kids Food Revolution plan to continue their collaboration into the future. The Tucson Village Farm broke ground in January 2010 and since then has grown from one woman’s dream into a dynamic agriculture and nutrition education program for youth. It’s clear that getting kids outside and engaged in physical activity and empowering them to develop healthier eating habits are the key ingredients in fighting childhood obesity. The Tucson Village Farm is proud to be a partner in the Food Revolution! About the author: Natalie Shepp is the mother of two food revolutionaries and a proud volunteer at the Tucson Village Farm. She is also the creator and Site Coordinator of her neighborhood community garden.
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